Jasmine Grandiflora Oil


Shil il ham’, I’m just wishing you happiness, delights, hope and good spirits as this Arabic phrase means “smell the scent of Jasmine and forget your troubles”.

jasmine-bannerAdmired for its absolute elegance and transfixing fragrance, Jasmine is always the sweetest and the most valuable flower in the garden of nature. Scientifically known as Jasminum Grandiflorum, this royal Jasmine variety blooms during the day and transforms its fragrant essence throughout the daylight hours.

Jasmine Grandiflora is known as Jati in Sanskrit and is used in Ayurveda for numerous centuries in the treatment of cancer, ulcer, dysmennorhea, labor pain, migraine, wounds, skin infections, odontalgia, paralysis, depression, flatulence, venomous bites, insomnia and reproductive problems.

Jasmine essential oil is extracted by solvent extraction method from the flowers and is also known to the world by other popular names like Royal Jasmine, Spanish Jasmine, Catalonian Jasmine and Pichcha.

Purchase Jasmine Grandiflora Oil – Wholesale – CLICK HERE

Historical importance of Jasmine Grandiflora:

Jasmine symbolizes a variety of exuberant thoughts in various parts of the world. It is a sign of divine hope in India and the sweetness of women in China. Jasmine and its essential oil have been traditionally used as an aphrodisiac all over the world. Since the ancient Arabic and Hindu traditional systems, it is admired as the ‘perfume of pure love’ and thus the expression “no perfume without Jasmine.

In the traditional Ayurvedic medicine, the decoction extracted from the leaves of Jasmine Grandiflora plant is used in treating toothache, poisonous insect stings and venomous snake bites. The cold infusion of the flower buds is used as a natural eye wash for relieving irritation and burning sensation in the eyes. Jasmine has been used in the Traditional Chinese Medicine as an effective aphrodisiac and as a natural aid for treating depression and promoting relaxation.

The flowers, leaves and roots of Jasmine Grandiflora has been used a popular substitute to standard western medicine in the treatment of bone cancer, breast cancer, malignant tumors in the lymph nodes, anxiety, stress and depression. It is also used in treating respiratory problems, skin diseases and as an assistance during child birth and menstrual difficulties.

Fresh Jasmine blossoms are used in making ornamental wreaths for hair, garlands and as religious offerings to God and Goddesses in the Hindu religion. These aromatic flowers are also used in making perfumes, attars and aromatic hair oils to maintain hair health and retain its natural fragrance.

Therapeutic properties and chemical constituents of Jasmine Grandiflora essential oil:

Jasmine essential oil has emmenagogue, diuretic, anticancer, stimulant, vermifuge, astringent, deobstruent, tonic, emollient, aphrodisiac, thermogenic, depurative, anthelmintic, suppurative, anodyne, antidepressant, neurasthenia and dentifrice properties.

It takes about 7.6 million Jasmine flowers to extract 1 kg Jasmine essential oil. The major chemical constituents of Jasmine essential oil are methyl jasmonate, benzyl acetate, jasmone, linalyl acetate, benzyl alcohol, linalool, indol and phenylacetic acid.

Ayurvedic health benefits of Jasmine Grandiflora essential oil:

Jasmine is held-high as a sattvic flower in Ayurveda as it is trusted to open the heart chakra that is responsible for love for self and for others. This ancient philosophy aims at complete wellness encompassing physical, mental and spiritual well-being. Thus the primordial Ayurvedic encyclopedia, Charaka Samhita states “The three – body, psyche, and soul – act as a tripod. The world stands upon them, and within them, the world abides.”

Ayurveda aims at longevity through healthy aging and prevention of illnesses by living a modest life with disciplined lifestyle by practicing an Ayurvedic routine, yoga, simple physical exercises, meditation, prayers and the use of herbs and essential oils in case of ill health. Ayurveda believes that everything is a part of nature and illnesses occur when human beings are against the rhythm of nature.

Every individual is regarded as a unique part of nature and should be treated in a unique manner even for the same disease according to Ayurveda. Just like our thumb impression, each one of us has a distinct individual constitution that is made up of three biological energies known as doshas. They are vata, pitta and kapha.

Every human being is embraced of these three doshas in different forms with the predominance of any one of these biological energies. Health according to Ayurveda is a perfect balance between these doshas and dosha imbalances cause sickness.

Ayurvedic remedies work in a physical, psychosomatic and spiritual perspective and aim at striking balance between these doshas. Jasmine Grandiflora essential oil is said to treat vitiated vata conditions and pacify pitta and kapha doshas. This oil has bitter, astringent, cool, light and dry properties that act on the reproductive, bone, plasma and nerve tissues through the circulatory, nervous and reproductive channels.

The Ayurvedic health benefits of Jasmine Grandiflora essential oil are:

1. Benefits for the skin:

Jasmine Grandiflora is a skin-friendly essential oil that aids in healing wounds, moistening dry skin, clearing skin impurities, help diminishing scars, reducing acne, treating eczema, dermatitis and encouraging healthy scalp. The antiseptic and moisturizing properties of Jasmine Grandiflora oil assists in killing micro-organisms that cause acne, dermatitis, psoriasis and make the wounds and cuts septic

Gently applying 2 drops of Jasmine oil blended with 1 ml Olive oil helps in balancing the secretion of sebum in the skin, support sensitive skin, and heal inflamed and aggravated skin.

The cicatrisant property of this oil promotes the growth of new cells and shore up cellular regeneration. By this way this aromatic blend helps in diminishing scars, stretch marks, blemishes and marks left by pimples and boils. Adding 1 drop of Jasmine oil to your bathing water is a great idea to nourish and protect your skin health everyday.

A 2010 study on ‘Wound Healing Activity of the Aqueous Alcoholic Extract of Jasminum Grandiflorum Linn Leaves’ by Shanti Bhushan Mishra, Alok Mukerjee, M. Vijayakumar, United Institute of Pharmacy has proved the effectiveness of the extracts of Jasmine leaves in repairing wounds and says “Jasminum grandiflorum leaf extract has a reproducible wound healing potential and thereby justifies its use in folklore medicine in India.”

2. Benefits for the respiratory system:

2 drops of Jasmine Grandiflora oil added to steam inhalation or vaporizer or warm bathing water aids in eliminating excess phlegm and mucus deposits in the lungs, chest and the nasal passages. Being an expectorant, Jasmine essential oil assists in treating cold, cough, sore throat, laryngitis, sinusitis, bronchitis, chest congestion, hoarse throats and nasal congestion.

3. Benefits to feminine problems:

Every woman passes through a number of complex stages in her life cycle and the most important among them are menstrual problems like dysmennorhea, amenorrhea and blocked menstruation, pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum blues and menopausal syndromes. This is mainly attributed to its affinity to the blood and reproductive tissues that move towards the uterus.

Jasmine Grandiflora essential oil acts as one among the best natural remedies for supporting womanly problems. This oil acts as an effective emmenagogue that helps in relieving dysmennorhea or menstrual pain, promote blocked or delayed menstruation and reduce other discomforts like nausea, fatigue, loss of temper etc, by pacifying the nerves and soothing the system. Blend 2 drops of Jasmine Grandiflora essential oil with 1 ml of sesame oil and massage it on your lower abdomen for immediate relief.

Being a uterine tonic as well as a parturient, Jasmine Grandiflora essential oil augments contractions, promote relaxation and lessen the severity of pain during labor. Massaging the lower abdomen and back with 4 drops of Jasmine oil mixed with 2 ml of Jojoba oil before childbirth can help in passing through a peaceful delivery as well as a painless post-natal recovery.

With its calming, cooling, soothing and anti-depressant properties, Jasmine essential oil can work wonders in treating postpartum depression and marks left behind by pregnancy including stretch marks. You can use it as a massage blend or in your diffuser or bath (2 drops of Jasmine oil) for overcoming post-delivery blues.

4. Benefits to the mind:

Jasmine Grandiflora is marked as an outstanding essential oil for treating depression and other emotional difficulties. With its anti-depressant, tonic, relaxant, sedative and aphrodisiac properties, this essential oil is said to work by generating positive reactions in the human brain through the limbic system, which is in charge for feelings, emotions and behaviors and is known as the control center of the brain.

“The fragrance diminishes fear; it is helpful in enhancing self confidence and defeating pessimism. No other oil is quite as capable of changing our mood so intensely. It offers little choice other than optimism,” says Susanne Fischer-Rizzi about Jasmine essential oil.

3 to 4 drops of Jasmine Grandiflora oil added to warm bath before going to bed can help in alleviating emotional strains, mental depression, fatigue, fear, lack of self confidence and negative feelings. Associated directly to the heart chakra, the caressing aroma of Jasmine oil acts a savior from the defensive feelings of life. It boosts confidence, soothes the nerves, balances feelings, restores positive energy and spreads the magic of selfless love all around.

The soothing and cooling effects of this oil suits enormously well for kapha and pitta based depression. Adding 2 drops of Jasmine oil to burner, diffuser or aromatic candles can help in treating insomnia, dreadful dreams, restlessness and feelings of insecurity.

5. Benefits to the digestive system:

Jasmine Grandiflora essential oil is a tremendous digestive aid that helps in treating flatulence, constipation, stomatitis, ulcers, ulcerative stomatitis and certain other digestive disorders. The ability to treat vitiated pitta helps control the secret of gastric acids and digestive juices in the stomach.

The cooling and wound-healing properties of this oil assist in healing the ulcerous wounds in the lining of the stomach and intestines. Mix 2 drops of Jasmine oil with 1 ml of sesame oil and massage it gently on the stomach and abdomen for stimulating bowel movements and assisting other digestive problems.

A study on the “Evaluation of Anti-Ulcer Potential of Leaves of Jasminum Grandiflorum L by the SGSPS Institute of Pharmacy, India have proved that Jasmine leaves have anti-ulcer effect that helps in treating peptic ulcer, wounds, ulcerative stomatitis, corns, ulcers etc. This study also insists on the use of Jasmine leaves in folk medicine for treating various ulcers and similar stomachic conditions.

A 2007 study on “Antiulcer and in vitro antioxidant activities of Jasminum grandiflorum leaves L.” concluded that the leaves of Jasmine Grandiflora plant possess free-radical scavenging abilities and anti-ulcer activities that make it a promising traditional medicine for treating acute gastric ulcer, ulcerative stomatitis and certain other health conditions.

Other health benefits:

Jasminum Grandiflora essential oil is also used in treating leprosy, corns, ottorrhoea, rectal bleeding, uterine problems, urinary infections, paralysis, mental debility, giddiness, cirrhosis, hepatitis and many other health problems.

Disclaimer:

This article is only for the purpose of information and is not directed to diagnose or substitute any prescribed medication or professional medical advice. Never take essential oils internally and always remember to use them in a diluted form as pure and organic essential oils are concentrated liquids and may cause harm if used directly on skin. Keep out of reach of children and be cautious if you are pregnant as Jasmine essential oil has emmenagogue properties that promote menstruation. Consult your Ayurvedic Practitioner before using the suitable essential oils for your unique individual constitution and state of health.

Thought for the day:

Flowers always make people better, happier, and more helpful; they are sunshine, food and medicine for the soul.   -Luther Burbank

Suggested Reading:

  1. Addiction-Free–Naturally: Liberating Yourself from Tobacco, Caffeine, Sugar, Alcohol, Prescription Drugs by Brigitte Mars
  2. The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils: The Complete Guide to the Use of Aromatic Oils In Aromatherapy, Herbalism, Health, and Well Being by Julia Lawless
  3. Holistic Pregnancy and Childbirth by James Marti
  4. ON T LIFE HISTORY OF A REMARKABLE UREDINE OF JASMINUM GRANDIFLORUM, L. by A. BARCLAY
  5. Jasmines by Harshita Joshi

Reference Links:

  1. Jasminum Grandiflorum by Wikipedia
  2. Evaluation of Anti-Ulcer Potential of Leaves of Jasminum Grandiflorum by Mahajan Nilesh, Sanghai Dhirendra, Dr. Sakarkar Dinesh International Journal of Pharmaceutical Science
  3. Jasmine: Its Story in Aromatherapy by Tim Noonan Consulting
  4. Wound Healing Activity of the Aqueous Alcoholic Extract of Jasminum Grandiflorum Linn Leaves by Shanti Bhushan Mishra, Alok Mukerjee, M. Vijayakumar, United Institute of Pharmacy published in Pharmacology Online
  5. Antiulcer and in vitro antioxidant activities of Jasminum grandiflorum leaves L by Umamaheswari M, Asokkumar K, Rathidevi R, Sivashanmugam AT, Subhadradevi V, Ravi TK published in PubMed

Jasmine Oil PG Grade


Flowers are always the fervent favorites of poets all over the world and greatly to everyone’s wonder; Jasminum Officinale is lovingly called as Poet’s Jasmine, Common Jasmine or Jessamine. The essential oil of Jasmine is extracted from the flowering buds by solvent extraction method. It is known as Jati, Johi and Chameli in Ayurveda and has been used for treating hiccoughs, poisonous stings, anger, sexual disorders, menopausal problems, post-natal depression, respiratory problems and skin diseases. The attar varieties and perfumes made from Jasmine are famous for more than thousands of years in various traditions of the world.

Purchase Jasmine Oil PG Grade – Wholesale – CLICK HERE

Historical uses of Jasmine Oil: Jasminum Officinale has its origin in central parts of Asia mainly in Northern India and China. It was the Moors who brought Jasmine to Spain after which its cultivation slowly spread to Morocco, France, Japan, Turkey and Italy. Jasmine is the national flower of Pakistan and its shield is represented by the floral wreath of Jasmine shrubs.

Since the prehistoric period, Jasmine flowers and the various parts of this evergreen plant including the leaves and roots have been in use for medicinal, culinary, ceremonial and aromatic uses. History denotes that the enchanting aroma of Jasmine flowers encircle the evening time with the magic of love, mystical thoughts, psychic dreams and endless fascination.

Jasmine is used as an important flower in the religious ceremonies in the Indian subcontinent and it is given as a sacred offering to Lord Vishnu. The garlands made with these flowers are considered as symbol of respect and used for welcoming special guests. These flowers are used as ornaments for hair and for offering Vedic rituals.

Jasmine has also been used as an ancient remedy for treating poisonous bites and stings. Jasmine oil was a popular anointing oil for Kings and affluent people during the times of Lord Buddha. It is also used in Indonesia for making garlands, hair ornaments and as a well-liked garnish.

This aromatic herb has been a vital part of the Traditional Chinese Medicine as an aphrodisiac and for certain other medicinal purposes. They used it in folk medicine for treating hepatitis in Southern China. A 2009 study on ‘Antiviral efficacy against hepatitis B virus replication of oleuropein isolated from Jasminum officinale L. var. grandiflorum’ published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology proved Jasmine officinale as a potential therapeutic agent for treating infections caused by Hepatitis B virus (HBV).

Chemical constituents and therapeutic properties of Jasmine essential oil: There are about 100 chemical components in Jasmine essential oil and the major ones are methyl anthranilate, benzoic acid, indole, linalool, ketone, linalyl acetate, nerol, benzyl acetate, cis- jasmone, farnesol, benzyl alcohol, benzaldehyde, nerolidol, cis-3-hexenyl benzoate and y-terpineol.

These components contribute to its remedial properties like anticancer, antidepressant, antiseptic, emmenagogue, galactogogue, astringent, analgesic, stimulant, uterine, sedative, expectorant, aphrodisiac, parturient, antispasmodic, diuretic, cicatrisant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anthelmintic.

Ayurvedic health benefits of Jasmine essential oil: Ayurveda is the knowledge of life that preached the healing discipline all over the world with absolute justice. This ancient healing methodology aged 5,000 plus years is known as the mother of all the healing systems on earth. Ayurvedic healing gave a new-fangled dimension to health as this elevated system aimed at enhancing physical health, strength of the psyche and the soul that witnesses the presence of life in a human being.

Other than Ayurveda, no other medicinal practice in this world considers human body as a temple where the eternal soul dwells in. It is for this noble reason, Ayurveda recommends human beings to keep their mind, body and the environment clean and healthy for the spirit to reside in harmony. When this harmony happens, human beings develop a strong system mentally, physically and spiritually paving way for healthy aging and longevity.

According to Ayurveda, the world and everything in this world are made up of five major elements known as Pancha Mahabhutas. They are water, earth, space, fire and air. These five elements combine together to form three predominant doshas or Ayurvedic body types. This helps in understanding the unique individual constitution of each and every person.

Every individual has a predominance of any one of these doshas that determine their personality, traits and behavior. Balance between these Ayurvedic body types symbolizes health and dosha imbalances lead to sickness. Ayurvedic remedies focus on striking perfect balance between these doshas and treatment varies from individual to individual even for the same sickness based upon their unique constitution.

Herbs, meditation, essential oils, Ayurvedic routine, healthy balance diet, yoga, prayers and simple physical exercises are the chief Ayurvedic remedies prescribed for health and heartiness. Jasmine essential oil is a tridosha oil that calms all the three doshas specifically the aggravation of pitta dosha in the head. It’s time to look at the Ayurvedic health benefits of Jasmine essential oil based upon the method of usage.

1. In Abhyanga or Ayurvedic massage therapy: Human skin is fundamentally the largest organ of the body. It acts as an excellent barrier for preventing the easy entry of harmful micro-organisms into the body. Ayurvedic massage therapy is the art of massaging with remedial essential oils.

Massaging your body with 5 drops of Jasmine oil blended with 2.5 ml Jojoba oil aids in treating depression, postpartum blues, pain, headache, rheumatism, nervousness, muscular pain, insomnia, tension, negative feelings and stress. It works like a wonder as the therapeutic properties of this oil penetrate deeply into the skin and pass on through the bloodstream. It calms the nerves, soothes the senses and inculcates self-confidence. This massage also aids in alleviating stress and depression by uplifting your mood and promoting relaxation for your system.

Massaging your scalp with 5 drops of Jasmine oil blended with 2.5 ml Almond oil helps in nourishing the scalp, treat anxiety, grant relaxation, enhance memory, improves hair health and leaves behind a natural fragrance. This massage is also helpful in treating headache, tension, confusions and lack of concentration.

As massage oil, Jasmine essential oil can also be of great assistance in treating male and female reproductive problems by promoting the secretion of male and female hormones testosterone and estrogen. With its emmenagogue properties, Jasmine essential oil helps in regularizing blocked menstruation, assist menopausal symptoms (like hot flush), reduce menstrual pain and other symptoms of menstruation by massaging your abdomen with this healing blend.

2. In baths and steam inhalation: Add 2 drops of Jasmine essential oil in warm bathing water for treating fatigue, anxiety, nervous tension, depression, premenstrual syndrome, muscular spasms and loss of sexual interest. Taking bath in this medicated water before going to bed can help in relaxing your mind and body, promote libido in both men and women, protect from dreadful dreams, stimulate the senses, induce peaceful sleep and loosen mucus and phlegm deposits. 1 drop of Jasmine oil added to foot bath can assist in calming down your mind and body, promote relaxation of sore muscles and reduce fever.

Adding 2 drops of Jasmine essential oil to steam inhalation helps in treating respiratory problems like cold, cough, bronchitis and sinusitis by clearing out the excess phlegm deposits and nasal congestion. This healing value is attributed to the antiviral and expectorant properties of Jasmine oil.

3. In vaporizers, burners and aroma lamps: Jasmine essential oil is an excellent remedy for alleviating depression, loss of interest, stress and other mental woes. All these pre-occupied thoughts in your mind will steal your peaceful sleep at night ending up in a mess at office in the morning. Jasmine essential oil has been proved to stimulate the mind and reduce symptoms of stress and depression.

By adding 2 drops of Jasmine oil to your diffuser, burner or vaporizer, you get to inhale the aromatic molecules of this heavenly oil, which passes through the nasal passages and reach the limbic system of the brain. It is known as the brain’s control center that transmits message to the mind and body for controlling feelings and emotions and thus transforming one’s behavior positively. You can sense the difference visibly as the biological factors like blood pressure, heart rate, breathing mechanism, immune functions and stress levels tend to turn normal and leave you relaxed and recharged.

Inhaling the invigorating aroma of Jasmine oil has also been said to treat pitta aggravation in the head that is responsible for loss of temper, insanity, loss of memory and certain other mental disturbances. It helps you control your anger, regain your memory power, augment your confidence level, give a lift to the attributes of love and respect for self and others and grants mental clarity.

The sensual fragrance of Jasmine essential oil especially during the night can turn on your love quotient. Jasmine has been used as a natural aphrodisiac for numerous centuries to improve the sexual drive and libido in men and women, treat impotence and frigidity, promote the natural flow of sexual feelings and instill love, trust and confidence in the partner.

4. In daily creams and lotions: Jasmine essential oil has amazing benefits for the skin. 2 drops of this oil added to your regular skin care creams and lotions assist in improving the texture of your skin, reduce blemishes, improves your skin tone and elasticity, moisten the skin, and treat allergies, open wounds and dermatitis. The cicatrisant and collagen enhancing properties of Jasmine essential oil makes it an exceptional remedy for lessening scars and stretch marks. Applying this aromatic lotion daily will guard your skin from the harmful microbes and help you stay fresh and fragrant throughout the day.

Other health benefits: Jasmine and its essential oil is also effective in treating diabetes mellitus, headache, scorpion stings, eye diseases, cancer, labour pain, addiction and uterine disorders.

According to a 2008 study on ‘Anti-Cancer Flower Power: Researchers Combat Cancer With A Jasmine-Based Drug’ published in the Science Daily, Prof. Flescher reveals that the synthetic compound jasmonate extracted from Jasmine is effective in treating cancerous tumors. The peer commentary also supports this research by saying “Methyl jasmonate has already been shown to have selective anticancer activity in preclinical studies, and this finding may stimulate the development of a novel class of small anticancer compounds.”

Disclaimer: This is only for the purpose of information and is not proposed to make a diagnosis or replace any prescribed medication or professional medical advice. Never ingest essential oils and always use them in a diluted form because organic and pure essential oils are highly concentrated liquids and can harm you if used directly on the skin. It is advisable to do a small patch test on your skin before using essential oils regularly. Consult your Ayurvedic practitioner before using the appropriate essential oils for your unique health condition and individual constitution. Care should be taken before using Jasmine essential oil if you are a pregnant or nursing mother.

Thought for the day:

Out in the lonely woods the jasmine burns Its fragrant lamps, and turns Into a royal court with green festoons The banks of dark lagoons.  -Henry Timrod

Suggested Reading:

  1. The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils: The Complete Guide to the Use of Aromatic Oils In Aromatherapy, Herbalism, Health, and Well Being by Julia Lawless
  2. Captivate Your Senses: Sensual Jasmine (A Scented Book Series) by Unknown
  3. The Encyclopedia of Aphrodisiacs: Psychoactive Substances for Use in Sexual Practices by Christian Rätsch, Claudia Müller-Ebeling
  4. Aromatherapy for Healing the Spirit: Restoring Emotional and Mental Balance with Essential Oils by Gabriel Mojay           

Reference Links:

  1. Jasminum Officinale by Wikipedia
  2. Health benefits of Jasmine essential oil by Organic Facts
  3. Jasmine by Kamlesh Ayurveda
  4. Antiviral efficacy against hepatitis B virus replication of oleuropein isolated from Jasminum officinale L. var. grandiflorum by Guiqin Zhao, Zhifeng Yin and Junxing Dong published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology
  5. Anti-Cancer Flower Power: Researchers Combat Cancer With A Jasmine-Based Drug published in Science Daily.com

Shea Butter


Did you use Shea butter today?

If yes, then you deserve a ‘PAT ON THE BACK‘ for being the ultimate reason behind the smiles of thousands of African women, who bank upon Shea butter for earning their livelihood.

Shea butter is the Blessed and Benevolent ‘BRAINCHILD’ of Almighty Himself.

I utter this statement simply because of a solid reason that ‘Shea’ is the most generous tree in the world, which is counted on by the economically-challenged and toiling African community.

Extraction of Shea butter has become the ‘bread winning’ profession of the most deprived and the valiant African women.

Women are nobly, the best creation in the planet. They adorn the world, wherever they are. All she touches turn to gold and all these florid words are to explore the secret behind the magnificence of Shea trees.

Shea-butter-bannerShea trees can live up to 200 years and Shea nuts are harvested by women in a traditional way.

It is a well known fact that Shea Butter comes from the tropics of Africa and you’d be glad to know that the process of extracting the butter is extremely unique. I for one thought that there was a very elaborate and strenuous procedure to it, but the ingenious way was actually quite simple.

The nuts of the Shea-Karite tree are first collected. It is said that these trees take nearly 15 years to bear fruit, and only after completion of 30 years, the tree begins to produce its best. Well, after the nuts are collected they are cracked, grilled and pounded. Next they are dropped into a pot of boiling water where they are boiled for hours till the butter floats to the surface.

The butter is then carefully scooped up from the surface and placed in a holding container to cool off. This is called unrefined or raw Shea Butter. Though West Africa used to be the major producer of Shea Butter, East Africa is beginning to take its turn in making the softest Shea Butter that you’d ever seen.

Purchase Shea Butter – Unrefined – 8 oz – CLICK HERE

Purchase Shea Butter – Grade A- Unrefined – 32 oz – CLICK HERE

Purchase Shea Butter – Unrefined – 5 lbs – CLICK HERE

What makes us talk about this?

When people of today list out their concerns, most of them focus on beauty and fitness! Even psychiatrists believe that a person’s physical appearance can certainly change the total well being of the individual. Coming to the conclusion that a lot of things in today’s world revolves around physical appearance, people have started focusing on the best of the best that can make them look and be their best.

While we are on the page of talking of what’s the best that could happen to the cosmetic industry, none can deny that Shea Butter is yellow gold from the God’ s themselves. Well that’s how most cosmeticians have gotten to know it.

For those of you who are quite new to the topic of discussion, let me guide you through the in and out of this buttery gold.

Let’s start by learning about the history and culture of Shea Butter.

History of Shea Butter:  

Shea Butter had found its place in the land of Africa centuries ago and has been mentioned of how well it has been cherished over the years. The butter has been immensely popular that it has been trapped in the history and culture of the West African wooded savanna.

You’ll find its mention in almost all the African historical documents which also dates back to the reference as early as Cleopatra’s Egypt, where caravans bearing clay jars of Shea butter for cosmetic use where mentioned back then.

The History also speaks of funeral beds of kings which were engraved in the woods of the old Shea trees, and the mention of Shea Butter as a primary ingredient in African pharmacology.

Shea butter has many useful properties and has been used for traditional hair and skin care, as cooking oil, and as a lamp fuel. The butter is of an ivory color which contains triglycerides and Unsaponifiables, including Katitene, Lupeol, Butryospermol, Parkeol, Karisterols, and cinnamic esters.

The butter is a resourceful active component known for its anti-aging, soothing and moisturizing properties. Shea Butter has been used as an important ingredient in beauty products across the world, for both skin as well as the hair to prevent them from drying out in the harsh African environment.  Observations carried out in 1940 found that the folk of Africa who used the butter had fewer occurrences of skin diseases than those who didn’t.

Culture of Shea Butter:  

Shea Butter in Togo:

Learning from a person who was bred in Togo I found that each linguistic group has their own name for the Shea tree and Shea butter., and in the language of Kaboli native of Togo, it was called oyi and the Shea tree is eggi-oyi.

In northern Togo, Shea Butter is very essential, and a valuable natural resource for this region. It’s used in food, cosmetic oil, and in the ceremonial practices of various ethnic groups in central Togo.

Shea Butter in Fulani Group Cultures:

Among the Fulani group Shea butter was used by the bride for 3 months before the wedding to beautify herself for the big day. The butter would be made by her mother or other female relatives.

The groom would also need to use the butter to prepare for the wedding. Godja ritual, which is a ritual of whipping, will be carried out by the bride parents to check the son-in-law’s willingness to endure physical pain for his bride.

If he shows the lightest signs of weakness during the ritual, the wedding will be called off and he will have to wait a year to try it again.  Shea Butter along with honey is used to treat the wounds before the wedding day.

Shea Butter in the Okalakun Plateau:

In central Togo, Shea Butter and its byproducts do play an important role in daily life. The residue that is left behind after the collection of the butter from the boiling water is nothing but milky red water. This water is said to have a certain scent that can ward away termites. Living in Africa termites can be a major cause of destruction to food and property.

So, the red milky water that is collected after removing the Shea oil is mixed with clay to form bricks. This is very effective, and has been adopted throughout central and northern Togo and is used for making granaries to store corn, millet and yams, which are susceptible very to termites.

Nature of Shea Butter:  

The butter is adaptable to all climatic conditions and is normally solid at room temperature. The aspect that I really like about the butter is that it quickly melts at body temperature making it extremely easy to use. Though this is the natural quality of the butter, the color and smell, even the quality of the butter may vary based on the method of extraction of the butter.

Though that this is the most suitable variety of Shea Butter to use, Shea Butter is also received in the market in two other varieties.

The first and the purest variety being the raw or unrefined butter that is obtained using water. This variety is similar to whipped butter, and sometimes takes the color of a grayish yellow.

The second would be the refined one which is highly processed taking extra effort to maintain its natural qualities.

The third would be the highly refined or processed solvent which uses hexane through the process to help with increasing the yield. Also to make the butter more pleasant to the eye, the processed Shea Butter is pure white.

Shea Butter and its Smell:

Understanding that the butter is derived from a nut, it is quite obvious that the butter has a nutty fragrance to it. This smell is seen only in the raw form of the butter and for those who find the smell to be unpleasant, may look or the processed forms of the butter.

Though, over a period of time the smell of the raw butter might diminish.  Since butter can go rancid, you might want to be on the look out to see if your butter is beginning to smell. ‘Your butter should never smell rotten.’

Properties & Composition of Shea Butter:  

As Shea Butter melts at body temperature, it gets rapidly absorbed into the skin and acting as a “re-fatting” agent. It is also pretty good at binding with water and hence extensively used in skin care. The butter contains fatty acids like stearic acid (20-50%), palmitic acid (2-9%), oleic acid (40-60%), linoleic acid (3-11%), and arachidic acid (<1%).

The stearic acid of the butter has the property of mixing and blending with oils and water, hence is commonly used in low concentrations to function as an additive in liquid cosmetics for skin and hair.

Because stearic acid helps water and oil mix, the ingredient is also added to many liquid cosmetics, and skin and hair care products in low concentrations to function as an additive rather than an active ingredient or cleansing agent.

Oleic acid on the other hand is a monounsaturated fat which is known for its preservative properties and also used as a cleaning agent in the manufacturing of soaps and detergents. Oleic acid is also an emollient and used in creams, lipsticks, lotions, and skin products.

Health Benefits of Shea Butter:

In general Shea Butter finds itself extensively used in the areas of the cosmetics industry for skin- and hair-related products. The butter contains an abundance of unsaponifiables which make it any cosmetic’s best friend. It is basically used as a conditioner for dry and brittle hair, skin moisturizer, creams and emulsions, and even seen in lip gloss.

You’d be surprised to know that the butter is also used as cooking oil, for candle-making, used as a cosmetic in hairdressing, a waterproof waxing, and also in medicinal ointments.

Musicians of Africa are even known to use the butter as a wax on their percussion instruments to increase the durability of wood. The butter is also used to bring out flavor in organic broths, and in the UK there are used to make softer tissue products for daily use (Toilet Paper).

SHeabutter-broucherShea Butter for the Skin:

As already stated in the nutritional facts, Shea Butter is loaded with vitamins. The focus of today is going to be on Vitamins A, E and F. These vitamins generally have a lot to do with maintaining and healthy nourished skin.

Vitamins A and E help keep the skin clear and healthy. On comparison with many extensively used fats and oils, we see that Shea Butter is high in Unsaponifiables, containing between 7-12% Unsaponifiables; which in relation to avocado oils that contain only 2-6%.

Anti-aging Properties of Shea Butter:

Regular usage of Shea Butter may prevent premature wrinkling of skin and the occurrence of facial lines, this being most women’s dream come true. The Vitamin F seen in the butter acts as a general skin protector, and a rejuvenator. Since the butter also contains essential fatty acids like vitamins A and E, they help in maintaining your skin’s elasticity and suppleness.

Shea Butter as a Moisturizer:

A research carried out in 2012 by the Tennessee State University states, “The properties of the tree are stearic acid, which promotes and protects skin barrier health (Fowler, 2008) and various ingredients such as triterpene alcohols, known to reduce inflammation; cinnamic acid esters, that have limited capacity to absorb ultraviolet (UV) radiation; and lupeol, this property prevents the effects of skin aging by blocking the action or function of enzymes that degrade skin proteins.”

The butter can also be used in treating sun damaged skin, mature skin, severely dry skin, chapped lips and also used in the treatment of damaged hair.  The presence of high level of Unsaponifiables seen in the butter is truly one of the reasons that make Shea Butter the choice in the treatment of above mentioned disorders.

The butter has the ability to soothe, hydrate and balance the skin and can be used as a moisturizer for dry skin and eczema, as a dry scalp treatment. The butter is often used on chapped lips, and to treat cracked dry skin on heels, elbows and knees.

Shea Butter as a Sun Screen:

Unlike other product of skin care, Shea Butter melts and gets absorbed into the skin allowing the skin to breath, favoring few skin related complications. Shea Butter also acts as a natural sun screen and provides a degree of protection from the sun due to the presence of cinnamic acid in it.

Shea Butter for Minor Skin Problems:

The butter is known for its soothing effect on the skin and has little evidence that it can treat minor skin conditions like eczema and acne. People who have used Shea Butter for treatment of psoriasis, claim that it has no side effects and is half as expensive as their regular treatment regimen.

There were even several instances when users of the butter reported absence of regular occurring rashes ever since they have put Shea butter to use. The properties of Shea Butter are extensive effective that as of today the butter is also used in getting rid of stretch marks as well. The butter I also good to use as a skin softener while you shave; you can use it instead of soap, or even post shave to make the skin smoother.

The American Shea Butter Institute strongly believes that; raw Shea butter maintains its therapeutic qualities, whereas processed Shea butter loses its healing properties. So sticking to the raw form of Shea Butter can make a worlds difference if you are looking for prompt results.

Shea Butter for the Hair:

Shea Butter is just great for the hair. It nourishes and moisturizes hair from the roots to the tips. Besides this, it also serves in protecting your hair from dryness, brittleness, and weather damage.  It serves bet for treating dry damaged hair, and can be used to restore life into damaged hair caused by heating iron.

The butter is readily absorbed into the scalp and prevents side effects such as the itchy, sticky feeling that you get when you use oils. On regular usage of Shea Butter on your hair, you’ll see life breathed into it and luster returned to those damaged shafts. Shea butter can also be used in conjunction with coconut or olive oil and other essential oils to nourish the skin, hair and scalp.

Medicinal Benefits of Shea Butter:

Shea butter is a good emollient and has found its way into making medicinal ointment as well. The butter has anti-inflammatory properties, and humectants properties. The butter is commonly used in sun blocks, lotions as treatment of sun tanned or skin damaged by the sun.

Shea butter is also used in the treatment of sinusitis and relief of nasal congestion in Nigeria, and also massaged into joints and parts of the body where pain is experienced. Besides this, the butter is also used in treating insect bites and rheumatism.

A research on ‘Anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive effects of triterpene cinnamates and acetates from Shea fat’ in the year 2010 states that, “The biological activities of triterpene acetate and cinnamate esters, together with the exceptionally high levels of these triterpenes in Shea fat, indicate that Shea nuts and Shea fat (Shea butter) constitute a significant source of anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor promoting compounds.”

Conditions to Use Shea Butter:

Just to make things very clear, I am listing out a few conditions where you might want to put Shea Butter to the task for immediate effects.

Some of them are skin rash, Blemishes and wrinkles, Skin peeling, after tanning, dry skin, Itching skin, Sunburn, Small skin wounds, Skin cracks, Tough or rough skin, Frost bites, Shaving cream for a smooth silky shave, Stretch mark prevention during pregnancy, Insect bites, Cold weather, Muscle fatigue, aches and tension, Skin allergies such as poison ivy or poison oak, Dermatitis, Eczema, For before and after strenuous exercise, Healthy skin, and Skin damage from heat.

What makes Shea Butter Stand Apart?

When it comes to comparing seed oils they are divided or categorized based on two fractions. One being the saponifiable fraction, which refers to the moisturizing properties of the product of concern, and the other, refers to nonsaponifiable fraction, which pertains to the healing properties.

The fraction that makes Shea Butter looks like the emperor is when it comes to the healing fraction.  We see that Shea Butter contains important nutrients, vitamins, and other valuable phytonutrients required for healing, and this fraction increases from 5% upto 17% depending on the source from which the butter is retrieved. This quite explains, the larger the healing fraction, the better the quality of butter.

This in comparison to other seed oil we see, that most of them have less than 1% or not more than 1% of healing fractions.

On the other and since Shea Butter has both the moisturizing fraction and the healing fraction, using it as a cream on a regular basis can be used to treat itching, sunburns, blemishes, insect bites, frost bite, wrinkles, eczema, small skin wounds, skin allergies, and other skin conditions. For this reason the Shea Tree is also termed as the karite tree, meaning the TREE OF LIFE.

Storing Shea Butter:

Like most butters Shea Butter doesn’t have to be refrigerated. The butter can be stored in a cool dry place, making sure that it’s covered in a dry, air-tight container. This butter can be stored and used for a period of two years, and though its properties might reduce over a period of years, it can always be used as a moisturizer.

Greener Life Diamond™ & Essential Depot: 

At Essential Depot our products are animal friendly, bio healthy and all business are performed under fair trading. Our Shea Butter is one of our first to be approved and certified under Greener Life Certified TM along with the new Greener Life Diamond™ Here we sell only the finest Organic African Unrefined Shea Butter, which is completely raw, unrefined and has a thick and often nutty aroma. We abstain from using bleaches, deodorizers, or chemicals to change the scent or appearance of Shea Butter.

To understand the quality of the product, Greener Life Diamond™ gives a numeric value in each sector so that consumers can quickly make ethical purchasing decisions. This numeric value is based on 4 quadrants representing the four major aspects of health, social and environmental responsibility.  At Essential Depot, Shea Butter is rated with a 0 in each sector, signifying that the highest standards for each quadrant have been met.

Essential Depot takes absolute pride in presenting the best ever Shea Butter in the world with its mind-blowing Greener Life Diamond certification that grants you the promise of using the best Shea butter that is skin safe, environment friendly, manufactured with complete animal friendliness and adheres to absolute fair trade practices.

Producers of Shea Butter in Ghana:

The producers of the Shea Butter are usually the local women who are just trying to feed their families.

But theirs is a lot of struggle in Ghana just to get a meal on the table. According to the International Journal of Development Research, in May 2014 a study was done on ‘AN ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING WOMENS’ CAPACITIES AS TRADITIONAL SHEA BUTTER PROCESSORS IN NORTHERN GHANA ’ ; where we see that 600,000 women in Northern Ghana depend on incomes from the sale of Shea butter and other Shea-related products as a means of their daily sustenance via, supplementing the family food budget and meeting medical and educational expenses. But with the problems that are faced such as decreased income, poverty, hunger, malnutrition, and social disruption things are becoming no easier to handle.

To Reflect:

Shea butter is by far the smoothest natural plant butter in the world but with the hardest efforts of the African women populace.

By using Shea butter, you can take absolute pride in honoring and saluting the determination and perspiring efforts of such beautiful ladies on the earth.

Every time, you use Shea butter, you would be the reason behind their smiles (earning their living).

And own the joy of partnering with these resolute women in making the world much more beautiful.

Reference Links:

  1. Shea Butter by Wikipedia
  2. Shea Butter by Shea Institute
  3. Shea Butter by Digital Scholarship TN state
  4. Shea Butter by PubMed